Strategic alliance fosters collaboration and shared resources for greater global impact

DALLAS (June 26, 2018) – The Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas has recently joined the Neuroscape Alliance, an international affiliation of academic institutions, clinical centers, and research facilities that share the vision of leveraging new, noninvasive technology to advance translational neuroscience research.

“The Neuroscape Alliance relies on leading-edge pioneers like The Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas to drive the rapid translation of neuroscience into real-world solutions,” said Dr. Adam Gazzaley, founder and executive director of Neuroscape at the University of California, San Francisco. “We are excited to welcome The Center for BrainHealth to the alliance, and we are confident that together we will continue to reshape education, wellness and medicine.”

The alliance’s participating institutions share access to new technology and best practices for study design, as well as the ability to conduct multisite clinical trials and pursue new funding opportunities.

“Brain health is one of the most vital fields of scientific exploration today,” said Dr. Lara Ashmore, director of emerging technologies and online programs at the Center’s Brain Performance Institute. “We are pleased to participate in the Neuroscape Alliance with the common goal of speeding up progress in developing science-based assessments and interventions to benefit humanity.”

About Center for BrainHealth

The Center for BrainHealth, part of The University of Texas at Dallas, is a research institute committed to enhancing, preserving and restoring brain health across the lifespan. Scientific exploration at the Center for BrainHealth® is leading edge, improving lives today and translating groundbreaking discoveries into practical clinical application. By delivering science-based innovations that enhance how people think, work and live, the Center and its Brain Performance Institute™ are empowering people of all ages to unlock their brain potential. Major research areas include the use of functional and structural neuroimaging techniques to better understand the neurobiology supporting cognition and emotion in health and disease.